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Off topic: 泰晤士(TIMES)四合院儿
Inițiatorul discuției: QHE
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Trip to North America May 5

wherestip wrote:

David, enjoy your trip to Europe.

I am going to make a trip to North America.



http://www.cnn.com/videos/travel/2017/01/19/houston-marriott-marquis-lazy-river.cnn


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wherestip  Identity Verified
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Happy Cinco de Mayo 2017 May 5

Yueyin,

Speaking of North America, today the U.S. celebrates Cinco de Mayo



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ysun  Identity Verified
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Happy Cinco de Mayo May 5

http://graphics.comments.funmunch.com/holidays/cinco-de-mayo/cinco-de-mayo-comment-030.gif

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ysun  Identity Verified
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Let's make a trip to North America May 5



Declaration of Independence Find
http://www.snopes.com/luck/declaration.asp

In 1989, a Philadelphia financial analyst bought an old painting (a depiction of a country scene) for $4 at a flea market in Adamstown, Pennsylvania, mostly because he liked the frame. He liked it even more once he found that the painting housed a rare and valuable document.

The buyer was investigating a tear in the canvas, and the frame fell apart in his hands when he attempted to detach it from the painting, leading him to discover a folded document which appeared to be an old copy of the Declaration of Independence stored between the canvas and its wood backing. After a friend who collected Civil War memorabilia advised him to have it appraised, he learned that the document was in fact a rare original Dunlap broadside, one of 500 official copies from the first printing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776.



March 2006 saw a smaller-scale repetition of this experience when Michael Sparks was browsing a thrift shop in Nashville, Tennessee, and happened upon a yellowed, shellacked, rolled-up document. Learning from a clerk that the item could be had for a mere $2.48, Sparks purchased it, took it home, and after doing some online research eventually learned that he had bought one of 200 “official copies” of the Declaration of Independence commissioned by John Quincy Adams in 1820.


$100 Million 'National Treasure' Found at Flea Market
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/100-million-national-treasure-found-at-flea-market-96281328.html
A true copy of the original handwritten 1776 Declaration of Independence rescued from obscurity by Tom Lingenfelter of Bucks County, Pennsylvania is to be offered for sale at a yet undetermined venue. Lingenfelter, a former Counter-intelligence Special Agent and President of the Heritage Collectors' Society, purchased the Declaration at a Bucks County flea market 20 years ago.

Believing it to be merely a souvenir copy his research showed, to the contrary, he had discovered the only true facsimile copy of the original Declaration of Independence ever produced. Lingenfelter's meticulous detective work uncovered astonishing facts about the document's production, including the existence of only two 'anastatic' copies, one which sold at Thomas Birch's Sons Auctioneers, Philadelphia in 1891.


[Edited at 2017-05-06 14:33 GMT]


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QHE
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"the" May 6


Chinglish is the combination of the Chinese culture and the English language. China English has linguistic characteristics that are different from the normative English in all linguistic levels, including phonology, lexicon, syntax, and discourse.[38]

At the phonological level, Chinglish does not differentiate between various vowel qualities because they don't exist in Chinese.

At the lexical level, China English manifests itself through many ways such as transliteration and loan translations.

As Chinese grammar does not distinguish between definite and indefinite articles, Chinese speakers struggle with when to use or not use the English definite article "the".

At the syntactic level, Chinese thinking has influenced Chinglish speakers to utilize a different sequence and structure to make sentences.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinglish#Features


READ MORE
http://www.proz.com/post/2642864#2642864
http://www.proz.com/post/2644090#2644090
http://www.proz.com/post/2647519#2647519
http://www.proz.com/post/2649326#2649326


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wherestip  Identity Verified
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... in the eye of the beholder May 6

QHE wrote:


At the lexical level, China English manifests itself through many ways such as transliteration and loan translations.

As Chinese grammar does not distinguish between definite and indefinite articles, Chinese speakers struggle with when to use or not use the English definite article "the".

At the syntactic level, Chinese thinking has influenced Chinglish speakers to utilize a different sequence and structure to make sentences.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinglish#Features



I definitely agree with you, QHE. There's also this sentence in the section that you quoted from ...

Chinglish reflects the influence of Chinese syntax and grammar.[42] For instance, Chinese verbs are not necessarily conjugated and there is no equivalent article for English "the", both of which can create awkward translations.



However, as awkward as the terms "Corn on Ear" and "Grain in Ear" sound, the people that originally came up with these translations may have had some other considerations in mind, such as shortening the phrase as much as possible, or omitting the articles in a title or name, etc..

As I mentioned before, "IMO what constitutes 'Chinglish' (in the non-derogatory sense) highly depends on the perspective of the individual reader."; partly because there really is no hard-and-fast rule as to when in front of a noun an article is absolutely needed. In some circumstances the use of an article could be optional or even subjective. One might want to say, in such cases where normally an article might be missing or might be redundant, "Chinglish" is only in the eye of the beholder.  


~*~*~*~*


p.s., Not that I like to talk out of the both sides of my mouth, I just wanted to make sure I mentioned the above caveat to the prior opinions I expressed, which summarily stated would be neither "Corn on Ear" nor "Grain in Ear" sounds like proper English to me.      Thanks for putting some links to my recent musings on this all in one place, BTW.  


[Edited at 2017-05-07 11:44 GMT]


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wherestip  Identity Verified
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British English vs. American English May 7

Just to make things interesting (or more complicated), I would also like to point out some situations where the habits of using the definite article may differ somewhat between Americans and Britons.

https://www.englishforums.com/English/IsHospitalHospitalBritishAmerican-English/klcjc/post.htm

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/19604/is-there-a-reason-the-british-omit-the-article-when-they-go-to-hospital

https://www.quora.com/British-people-say-going-to-hospital-or-at-university-Most-Americans-would-have-the-in-both-phrases-Is-there-a-general-rule-when-the-is-omitted-in-British-English


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ysun  Identity Verified
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American English & British English - 8 Grammar Differences May 7

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLWBwsRp9Pk

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ysun  Identity Verified
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Rules of using the definite article May 7

wherestip wrote:

Just to make things interesting (or more complicated), I would also like to point out some situations where the habits of using the definite article may differ somewhat between Americans and Britons.

Steve,

I agree with you in that there are "some situations where the habits of using the definite article may differ somewhat between Americans and Britons". However, I think the basic rules of using the definite article are the same in American English and British English.

I also agree with the comments below from this link:
https://www.quora.com/British-people-say-going-to-hospital-or-at-university-Most-Americans-would-have-the-in-both-phrases-Is-there-a-general-rule-when-the-is-omitted-in-British-English
Is the assertion correct in the first place? I have never heard a US citizen talk about “going to the college” unless it were a specific college. They usually talk of “going to college”. Why would it be different for university or hospital?

...

It is to do with the specific and the general.
At University - I am at university somewhere.
At the University - I am at the university we are discussing.

Going to hospital - any hospital.
Going to the hospital - I am at the hospital we are discussing.


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wherestip  Identity Verified
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Hospital May 7

Yueyin,

Yes, the basic rules are surely the same. But from my experience, when it comes to referring to a hospital, American English seldom drops the article regardless of whether the hospital is specific or not.



https://www.englishforums.com/English/AdmittedHospitalAdmitted-Hospital/jncpq/post.htm

12th July 2009
victor_amelkin

Additionally to the answers given above, I noticed that "the" sometimes appears before "hospital". Maybe it's AmE or perhaps it's not English-variant-specific but simply if you imply some particular hospital.


12th July 2009
khoff

Speakers of American English would generally say "He's in the hospital." If someone is just visiting a hospital, or making a delivery there, or working there, rather than admitted as a patient, we would say, "She's at the hospital." "The hospital" does not necessarily imply that we know the name or location of the hospital. ("Mary just called from New York. They were in an accident and John is in the hospital.")

Less common, but possible if you want to expresss (sic) a great deal of doubt about the location or identity of the hospital, is "a hospital." "John was riding his bicycle across Africa and I just heard he's in a hospital somewhere, but no one seems to know much about it."

Americans pretty much never say "he's in hospital" without the article.



My mistake for opening a new can of worms. I believe we're moving beyond discussing the merits (or lack thereof) of the phrases "Grain in Ear" and "Corn on Ear".


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ysun  Identity Verified
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You are right May 7

wherestip wrote:

Yueyin,

Yes, the basic rules are surely the same. But from my experience, when it comes to referring to a hospital, American English seldom drops the article regardless of whether the hospital is specific or not.

http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/hospital
hospital

a large building where sick or injured people receive medical treatment

They are building a new hospital.

in hospital British English
She visited him in hospital.

in the hospital American English
Two people are in the hospital with serious burns.

COLLOCATIONS
VERBS

go to hospital British English, go to the hospital American English
The pain got worse and she had to go to the hospital.

be taken/rushed/airlifted to hospital British English, be taken/rushed/airlifted to the hospital American English
Three people were taken to hospital after a crash on the motorway.

be admitted to hospital British English, be admitted to the hospital American English
He was admitted to hospital suffering from chest pain.

leave/come out of hospital British English, leave/come out of the hospital American English
Her mother never left the hospital.

be discharged/released from hospital British English, be discharged/released from the hospital American English (=be allowed to leave a hospital because you are better)
It was several weeks before he was released from hospital.


[Edited at 2017-05-07 17:26 GMT]


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wherestip  Identity Verified
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La Marseillaise May 7

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqZq5v8UjNg

La Marseillaise (Julien Neel, Adam Scott)


Allons enfants de la Patrie
Le jour de gloire est arrivé
Contre nous de la tyrannie
L'étendard sanglant est levé
L'étendard sanglant est levé
Entendez-vous dans les campagnes
Mugir ces féroces soldats?
Ils viennent jusque dans vos bras
Égorger vos fils, vos compagnes



Aux armes, citoyens
Formez vos bataillons
Marchons, marchons
Qu'un sang impur
Abreuve nos sillons


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wherestip  Identity Verified
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French May 7

蛤蟆跳井 - 不懂

Nevertheless ...  


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wherestip  Identity Verified
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Bette Midler in the Broadway Revival of "Hello, Dolly!" May 7

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=od1GDmfPldY



https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/20/theater/hello-dolly-review-bette-midler.html


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QHE
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麦芒掉进针眼里 May 7

wherestip wrote:

蛤蟆跳井 - 不懂
Nevertheless ...  



Steve,

You'll be surprised how many French words you already know, 巧得出奇!


Loanwords
Major Periods of Borrowing in the History of English
http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~kemmer/Words/loanwords.html

List of English words of French origin
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_French_origin






    [Edited at 2017-05-08 03:21 GMT]

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泰晤士(TIMES)四合院儿

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